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Posts Tagged ‘clarity’

Should You ALWAYS Do Your Very Best?

TrophyThe case for—and against—perfection.

In striving to be our best, it’s possible that we sometimes have to do less than our best. Or do we?

There are two main schools of thought on this.

On one side, you have those who say everything counts and everything matters. They believe that how you do anything is how you do everything. The argument is that if you let your guard down even a little, if you accept anything less than excellent, you are going to do the same in all other areas.

It’s a strong point of view.

But the contrary view also has its points. Those on this side of the fence say that some projects matter more than others. They maintain that there are some times when doing your very best just isn’t worth it. Something done well but not necessarily with excellence is better than something done perfectly but completed too late. Done is good, as they say.

Do you have a messy desk at work and a super neat environment at home? Or is it the other way around? Do you take your job seriously but your relationship with your family not so much? Some of this has to do with our core values and some with our habits and belief systems. But it is worthy of exploration.

I play a lot of tennis—mostly fun, friendly, recreational tennis. And on occasion I play in a tournament. You could say that even if you play this kind of tennis, you should always play at the top of your game—to always go for your best. But the fact is, some games aremore important than others. And some points are more critical than others. Some opponents cause me to step up my game and others don’t always bring out my best. I want to be serious about the game, play well and always try to improve. But I certainly don’t want to take it so seriously that it’s not any fun—or it’s not fun to play with me.

It’s a bit of a dance, yes?

I also play Words with Friends (like Scrabble) on my genius phone. When playing with some people, I know that I don’t always have to get the absolute best score on each turn in order to win the game. Others bring out the best in me (like my wife). But even then, is it worth spending a whole bunch of time to eke out the ultimate best score each turn or simply give it a good shot and play on with the game? Maybe I care more about tennis than a word game. I’m thinking about that.

Here at SuccessNet, we’re committed to under-promising and over-delivering.  But we’ve had many discussions as we’ve neared completion of a book, course, report or even an article as to whether it’s good enough, not good enough or we’re ready to declare it both excellent and complete. It’s a good idea to have standards with which to gauge your work as energy, enjoyment and interest do tend to wax and wane.

Another area where this comes up is in learning. When have you mastered something? When do you have enough working knowledge to get the job done? Do you have to go through every lesson? Do you have to become an expert? Again, it’s a judgment call, and it depends on what the subject is.

A good friend of ours is a captain on an Airbus 320. For him (and I hope other pilots) mastery is essential. But when it comes to learning how to use FaceBook? Probably not. If lives depend on it, sure. In other things, a much lower level of competence is probably ok. You have an unknown but yet finite amount of time. How you invest it is pretty important, I think.

My sense is that a good part of the argument has to do with the difference between excellence and perfection. Perfection is a setup for failure. I don’t think anything can ever be perfect. This article could always be made better. But if I was addicted to perfection it would never be published, and we wouldn’t be exploring our views on the subject and learning what will work best for us. Perfection can be a poison to our accomplishments, but excellence is most always worth striving for.

What do you think? I’d like to hear from you as to which side of the fence you’re on. Use the comment area below this post and weigh in.

 For an interesting description of excellence, go to this article . . .

 

Top Ten Reasons You Need a Coach/Mentor

coach1. Get and Stay Clear
Clarity leads to power. And a good coach will ask the right questions, get you thinking more clearly and keep you clear.

2. Keep You Focused
We all know how easy it is to get sidetracked, stopped or stalemated. And a good mentor can keep you constantly pointed in the right direction and moving forward.

3. Tough Decisions
Being unsure about the next best step or the best choice to make when the big decisions loom can stop you and render you ineffective. Your mentor can help you make those tough decisions and maintain momentum.

4. Sounding Board
Having someone to listen to you and bounce ideas off from is invaluable. Contrary to what is often said, we DO learn when we talk. Speaking our thoughts and ideas out loud clarifies our thinking.

5. Inspiration and Motivation
We all need to be motivated. We all need inspiration. And we need it often. Your coach can provide a regular dose of both.

6. Systems, Strategies and Tactics
Your coach can teach you the things his or her experience has provided. It’s always best to learn from those who have gone before.

7. Save Time, Money and Stress
By following the guidance, cautions and recommendations of your mentor, you can save yourself loads of heartache, regrets and resources that come from mistakes.

8. Build Your Network
The connections your mentor has can open doors that would take you many years to accomplish on your own. By introducing you to people who can help, you can cultivate and nurture a network that can last you a lifetime.

9. Challenge
A good coach will stretch you and challenge you to be your best—to go for things you likely would not on your own.

10. Celebrate Your Successes
Your mentor will remind you to celebrate your accomplishments. This will help you develop the practice of rejoicing and punctuating your wins.

Virtually all professional athletes have coaches. They know they need the perspective, experience and all the reasons mentioned above to play at their best. Why should you be any different?

Coaching Call with Me
Would you like me to help you solve a problem, brainstorm an idea, gain clarity on an issue, get advice on a course of action or do a mini business makeover?

Then click here to schedule your one-on-one call with me.

I’m willing to give you my personal and professional best—one-on-one for 50 minutes.

During this time I will listen, ask you questions, offer suggestions, provide resources, and help you get clear on the next steps for you to achieving your objective.

Or, I’ll help you get clear on what your top objectives are—what do you really want, why do you want them and how you can get there.

What would it be worth for you to get clear and go forward with confidence and clarity to achieve whatever you desire?

NOTE: Due to time restrictions, this offer may be withdrawn without notice.

Click here to schedule your one-on-one call with me.

The Rest of Your Life . . .

footprintsAny day now, I expect to get the call telling me my mother has passed on.

It‘s been less than two months since she was diagnosed with an incurable and inoperable cancer. And although her mind is strong and clear, every day her body gets weaker.

She has said her goodbyes, she’s at peace and she is without pain. She has nothing to resolve, no regrets and is appreciative of her long, well-lived life.

She will make her transition just as she has lived her 84 years—with grace, dignity, courage and compassion. She’s ready, but we will miss her greatly.

Watching someone experience their last days on earth can’t help but cause one to think more about our own mortality. One of the few things we know for sure is that we will all one day leave this earthly existence. And few of us will know when, where and how it will happen.

Life is short—or so it seems.

Regardless of how many days, months or years we have left, we all want to feel complete when we die. We want to have made a difference. We want to know that we mattered, that we’ve done something of significance.

What about you? What do you want to accomplish with the rest of your life? What dreams do you have left to achieve? What legacy do you want to leave?

My mother did not aspire to greatness. She simply did her best on a consistent basis. The result was, and is, a life well lived and an inspiration to many.

SuccessNet, the organization I founded 16 years ago this month, is dedicated to helping you experience more purpose, passion and prosperity. It—and we—have much more to do. If you have been informed, inspired and empowered to be your best, then I will feel we have succeeded. And I feel confident that the best is yet to come—for you and for SuccessNet.

I encourage you, as I am doing myself, to think deeply about achieving your full and unique potential. Richard Bach wrote, “Here’s a test to find out whether your mission on earth is finished: If you’re alive, it isn’t.”

Our Diamond Club and Inner Circle programs are uniquely designed to help you achieve your personal and professional best. And I would be glad to work with you in doing so.