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Posts Tagged ‘achievement’

Working at Wal*Mart, Cleaning Houses. Really?

lifestyle_couple_sidebarSomeone I play tennis with told me recently that the woman who cleans his house is 74 years old. Can you imagine that?

And every time I go to the grocery store, I see retirees working there.

I give them a lot of credit for their willingness to work. And maybe some of them just like to keep busy and earn a little extra money. But I’m guessing most of them simply aren’t able to get by very well without supplementing their Social Security checks.

It’s very sad.

According to a survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute, more than half of all workers (56%) say they have less than $25,000 in savings.

And the Deloitte Center for Financial Services found that 58% of U.S. workers don’t have any retirement plan at all.

What’s YOUR plan?

Can you count on a pension? Do you have a couple of million in your IRA? Could YOU live on a social security check?

The vast majority of Baby Boomers simply can’t.

These are some of the reasons we created the Lifestyle Business System.

A lifestyle business is one that operates on your terms with lots of flexibility, low to no overhead, no risk and usually no employees. It works for YOU instead of you working for it. It’s simple and it’s part time. And ideally, it’s in harmony with your core values and leverages your many talents, skills, your knowledge and your expertise.

It sure beats punching a time-clock at Wal*Mart.

Our very complete (12-module) course shows you exactly how to create a micro-business that can generate extra income for you now and a retirement income when you leave your current job.

Special pricing for you is in effect now.

And it’s all explained on this page . . .

You deserve to create an income while doing meaningful and interesting work.

P.S. Just the tax benefits of having a business of your own can make it worth your while. Let us show you how to monetize your knowledge, skills and experience. Click here to see the syllabus . . .

P.P.S. If you don’t take this route, I hope you have another good plan. Because I don’t want you to end up like so many others.

Get our free report: No Pension. No Portfolio. No Problem!

Should You ALWAYS Do Your Very Best?

TrophyThe case for—and against—perfection.

In striving to be our best, it’s possible that we sometimes have to do less than our best. Or do we?

There are two main schools of thought on this.

On one side, you have those who say everything counts and everything matters. They believe that how you do anything is how you do everything. The argument is that if you let your guard down even a little, if you accept anything less than excellent, you are going to do the same in all other areas.

It’s a strong point of view.

But the contrary view also has its points. Those on this side of the fence say that some projects matter more than others. They maintain that there are some times when doing your very best just isn’t worth it. Something done well but not necessarily with excellence is better than something done perfectly but completed too late. Done is good, as they say.

Do you have a messy desk at work and a super neat environment at home? Or is it the other way around? Do you take your job seriously but your relationship with your family not so much? Some of this has to do with our core values and some with our habits and belief systems. But it is worthy of exploration.

I play a lot of tennis—mostly fun, friendly, recreational tennis. And on occasion I play in a tournament. You could say that even if you play this kind of tennis, you should always play at the top of your game—to always go for your best. But the fact is, some games aremore important than others. And some points are more critical than others. Some opponents cause me to step up my game and others don’t always bring out my best. I want to be serious about the game, play well and always try to improve. But I certainly don’t want to take it so seriously that it’s not any fun—or it’s not fun to play with me.

It’s a bit of a dance, yes?

I also play Words with Friends (like Scrabble) on my genius phone. When playing with some people, I know that I don’t always have to get the absolute best score on each turn in order to win the game. Others bring out the best in me (like my wife). But even then, is it worth spending a whole bunch of time to eke out the ultimate best score each turn or simply give it a good shot and play on with the game? Maybe I care more about tennis than a word game. I’m thinking about that.

Here at SuccessNet, we’re committed to under-promising and over-delivering.  But we’ve had many discussions as we’ve neared completion of a book, course, report or even an article as to whether it’s good enough, not good enough or we’re ready to declare it both excellent and complete. It’s a good idea to have standards with which to gauge your work as energy, enjoyment and interest do tend to wax and wane.

Another area where this comes up is in learning. When have you mastered something? When do you have enough working knowledge to get the job done? Do you have to go through every lesson? Do you have to become an expert? Again, it’s a judgment call, and it depends on what the subject is.

A good friend of ours is a captain on an Airbus 320. For him (and I hope other pilots) mastery is essential. But when it comes to learning how to use FaceBook? Probably not. If lives depend on it, sure. In other things, a much lower level of competence is probably ok. You have an unknown but yet finite amount of time. How you invest it is pretty important, I think.

My sense is that a good part of the argument has to do with the difference between excellence and perfection. Perfection is a setup for failure. I don’t think anything can ever be perfect. This article could always be made better. But if I was addicted to perfection it would never be published, and we wouldn’t be exploring our views on the subject and learning what will work best for us. Perfection can be a poison to our accomplishments, but excellence is most always worth striving for.

What do you think? I’d like to hear from you as to which side of the fence you’re on. Use the comment area below this post and weigh in.

 For an interesting description of excellence, go to this article . . .

 

A Tribute to J. Francis Angier on His 90th Birthday

dadOne of my favorite poems was written by Edgar Guest entitled “I’d Rather See a Sermon than Hear One Any Day.”

It relates to much of the ways I see my father.

Like many fathers, Dad gave me a great deal of advice over the years. And like many sons, I rarely listened to it.

But, you see, I did observe my father. I saw what he did, and what he didn’t do.

He never had to tell me about being honest and having integrity, he just lived honestly and with integrity.

He never needed to lecture me about hard work and industry. I saw him work hard every day of his working life.

My father never needed to talk to me about being respectful to women. He just was. In fact, I never heard him denigrate women in any way. And he was always respectful and honoring of my mother.

He didn’t have to preach safety—although he did. He just went out of his way to practice safety in everything we did. It’s likely why most of his crew survived being shot down over Germany in the fall of 1944. And none of my family was ever seriously injured on our farm.

Dad didn’t talk much about humility and generosity. He simply demonstrated it all the time.

He didn’t spend much time explaining the value of good planning. But he planned his work and his business carefully.

He didn’t have to advise me on the value of education. Because he was a lifelong learner. And he read, and still does read, every day.

Dad didn’t tell us to love our country. But we knew he was a patriot and how much his country—and his service to it—meant to him.

So although the advice was there, what mattered most was demonstrating his best at being a good man. And it made all of us boys want to be a good man as well.

He set the standards pretty high. And I know I haven’t lived up to them all the time. Perhaps he didn’t either. But I know he did his best.

His sermon was, and still is, his life. And it mattered.

I’m so proud of you Dad. Happy 90th birthday!

ron-cover-smallNote: His first book, Ready or Not: Into the Wild Blue,
is available on Amazon (print and Kindle version)