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Archive for the ‘Productivity/Organization’ Category

$300 is All it Would Have Taken

A number of studies over the years have indicated that a large percentage of personal bankruptcies could have been avoided with only an additional $300 a month.

It doesn’t seem like much, does it? $3,600 a year to avoid the pain, anguish, poor credit rating and embarrassment of filing for bankruptcy. And the losses incurred by creditors not paid, of course, get passed on to consumers. So we all end up paying for the insolvency and liquidation.

So if an extra $300 a month can prevent most bankruptcies, just think what an extra $500, $1,000 or $3,000 a month could do.

Imagine the vacations, college funds, retirement plans, new cars, better homes, debt elimination and charities that could be covered by generating the extra income.

And just think of the freedom that comes from KNOWING you can always create the income you need. THAT’S financial independence.

Whether you start a network marketing business, turn your hobby into an enterprise or create a lifestyle business, you will have greater freedom and also teach your children and others that profits are way better than wages.

Yes, you CAN create your own money machines. You really can. It requires some different thinking and it requires different training than you most likely have received.

It doesn’t take much money and there’s virtually no risk. You can start small and build from there. You can begin to monetize your knowledge, experience, interests and expertise.

If you think you’re ready, we recommend The Lifestyle Business System explained on this page . . .

If you’re not quite there yet, we suggest you get this super-inexpensive eBook. It will open your eyes to the possibilities. And when you decide to take the next step and enroll in the course, I’ll even give you credit for the few dollars you invested in the eBook. It’s called 20 Ways to Make $100 a Day Online. Find out more on this page . . .

Here at SuccessNet, we’re committed to helping you design, create and live your ideal life. Getting free from debt and being financially independent is certainly part of it.

P.S. One thing is for sure—things are highly unlikely to improve much unless you change something. And your financial freedom sure seems like it’s worth it. It’s never too late. You can do it. And we’d like to help.

P.P.S. If you’re already set financially and you’re living your ideal life, please share this article and these ideas with someone who is not yet as fortunate.

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“Is Your New Program for Me?”

FrustratedWe got a message yesterday from an acquaintance who was wondering about our new Lifestyle Business System. I thought I’d share it with you because you might have similar questions. Her message went like this:

“Hi Michael. I’ve been watching your posts about your new course. Is there anything for me in this program, or do you actually have to own a business? I’m really trying to figure out a new way of earning a decent income. I’ve developed some health challenges and cannot continue working at what I’m doing. I know I can do better for myself and my family and was just wondering if this would help.

Thanks for your time. Looking forward to hearing from you!”

My response:

“Hi Debbie. Great to hear from you. Thanks for reaching out and asking about The Lifestyle Business System. I’m really sorry to hear of your health issues, and we wish you the best in dealing with them.

I’ll do my best to answer your question about whether or not LBS is for you or not. From that, I trust you can make a considered and informed decision for yourself.

Do I actually have to own a business? The short answer is no, you do not need to have a business to benefit from the course. But you would need to START a business—a simple, part-time, no risk, no bricks and mortar—something you can do from home with your computer and an internet connection.

And you don’t need to already have a business idea—although if you do, that’s fine. The course shows you exactly how to determine the best idea to marry your interests, passion and expertise into something that earns you an income. You can create steady streams of income by taking something in which you have genuine interest:  a hobby, career experience or cause—and monetize it.

Depending on the target market and subject matter you choose, it could be something that creates a few hundred dollars or several thousand dollars a month.

The course is designed to help you go from idea to income in just a few weeks. It contains 12 training modules (outlined at Lifestyle Business) with each one showing you the steps you need to take to create a customized, easy-to-start and easy-to-run micro business.

I believe that our golden years should be a time of doing part-time, meaningful and interesting work—creating value for others and earning income in return. And I think you deserve to do something that more fully utilizes your talents, knowledge and abilities than working for someone else.

It will take initiative on your part, for sure. But it’s not complicated, and it sure beats working on someone else’s schedule. It may take a few weeks or even months to start generating real money, but it is a proven system. In fact it’s the very same system we’ve used to build SuccessNet into the global enterprise it is today—just on a smaller scale.

If you haven’t already done so, I suggest you get and study the free report, “No Pension, No Portfolio, No Problem!” at Lifestyle Business. From there, take a look at the course offering (including syllabus and bonuses) on this page . . .

The course also contains two “courses within the course” that are worth almost as much as the entire LBS course itself—AND a lifetime Gold Membership in SuccessNet ($149 value).

After you look at the report and the course offering, you should be able to easily determine if this is a good match for you. And if you have specific questions, I will be more than glad to personally answer them for you.

Thanks again for contacting me. I hope we have a chance to help you create an income for you and your family with The Lifestyle Business System.

PS: It’s also something in which you can involve your children to grandchildren and help them create financial independence for themselves. Because profits ARE better than wages. 

Should You ALWAYS Do Your Very Best?

TrophyThe case for—and against—perfection.

In striving to be our best, it’s possible that we sometimes have to do less than our best. Or do we?

There are two main schools of thought on this.

On one side, you have those who say everything counts and everything matters. They believe that how you do anything is how you do everything. The argument is that if you let your guard down even a little, if you accept anything less than excellent, you are going to do the same in all other areas.

It’s a strong point of view.

But the contrary view also has its points. Those on this side of the fence say that some projects matter more than others. They maintain that there are some times when doing your very best just isn’t worth it. Something done well but not necessarily with excellence is better than something done perfectly but completed too late. Done is good, as they say.

Do you have a messy desk at work and a super neat environment at home? Or is it the other way around? Do you take your job seriously but your relationship with your family not so much? Some of this has to do with our core values and some with our habits and belief systems. But it is worthy of exploration.

I play a lot of tennis—mostly fun, friendly, recreational tennis. And on occasion I play in a tournament. You could say that even if you play this kind of tennis, you should always play at the top of your game—to always go for your best. But the fact is, some games aremore important than others. And some points are more critical than others. Some opponents cause me to step up my game and others don’t always bring out my best. I want to be serious about the game, play well and always try to improve. But I certainly don’t want to take it so seriously that it’s not any fun—or it’s not fun to play with me.

It’s a bit of a dance, yes?

I also play Words with Friends (like Scrabble) on my genius phone. When playing with some people, I know that I don’t always have to get the absolute best score on each turn in order to win the game. Others bring out the best in me (like my wife). But even then, is it worth spending a whole bunch of time to eke out the ultimate best score each turn or simply give it a good shot and play on with the game? Maybe I care more about tennis than a word game. I’m thinking about that.

Here at SuccessNet, we’re committed to under-promising and over-delivering.  But we’ve had many discussions as we’ve neared completion of a book, course, report or even an article as to whether it’s good enough, not good enough or we’re ready to declare it both excellent and complete. It’s a good idea to have standards with which to gauge your work as energy, enjoyment and interest do tend to wax and wane.

Another area where this comes up is in learning. When have you mastered something? When do you have enough working knowledge to get the job done? Do you have to go through every lesson? Do you have to become an expert? Again, it’s a judgment call, and it depends on what the subject is.

A good friend of ours is a captain on an Airbus 320. For him (and I hope other pilots) mastery is essential. But when it comes to learning how to use FaceBook? Probably not. If lives depend on it, sure. In other things, a much lower level of competence is probably ok. You have an unknown but yet finite amount of time. How you invest it is pretty important, I think.

My sense is that a good part of the argument has to do with the difference between excellence and perfection. Perfection is a setup for failure. I don’t think anything can ever be perfect. This article could always be made better. But if I was addicted to perfection it would never be published, and we wouldn’t be exploring our views on the subject and learning what will work best for us. Perfection can be a poison to our accomplishments, but excellence is most always worth striving for.

What do you think? I’d like to hear from you as to which side of the fence you’re on. Use the comment area below this post and weigh in.

 For an interesting description of excellence, go to this article . . .