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Honor, Respect and Acknowledgment
 

This past week, I had the privilege and the honor to witness a small, yet moving ceremony.
 

At the VA in White River Junction, Vermont, one Purple Heart recipient (injured in action) and five Bronze Cross recipients (for valor) were officially presented with their medals.

 

These octogenarians had earned these medals over 60 years ago during World War II. But they had never been recognized in an official military ceremony. This week, they were.

 

The Purple Heart recipient was my father—Major J. Francis Angier.

 

A number of years ago, I was able to get all of his medals from the Army Air Corp. Some of his medals had been stolen and some had yet to be awarded when he was shot down and became a POW in October of 1944.

 

He never would have asked for them on his own, but he was pleased that we were successful in obtaining them.

 

There's something special about a public acknowledgement of one's accomplishments. And this was one of those times.

 

I was honored and privileged to be asked to pin the Purple Heart directly over the heart of my father. As I hugged him afterward, I was moved to tears.

 

Nothing makes my eyes sweat more than family, honor and freedom.

 

And nothing can take the place of acknowledging someone for their best efforts. I've never seen where someone received too much recognition for extraordinary service.

 

Action Point

Take every opportunity to acknowledge people for their efforts. Thank a serviceperson for their contribution and their sacrifice. Never let a chance go by to genuinely praise someone for doing what they do.

 

Related Resource

Ready or Not: Into the Wild Blue
J. Francis Angier's fascinating story of his preparation for the air war over Europe and his shoot-down and capture is told in this entertaining and inspiring book—now in its 5th printing.
Find out more . . .   Read the Foreword here.

By Michael Angier

 

 

       

 

 

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Last Updated 10/23/2005